Photoset

danielnyariillustrations:

Did a half-page and a spot illustration for ESPN Magazine this month. Subject was the increasing scrutiny umpires in baseball are put through due to the replay rule. 

One of my favorite formats to work in. Thanks to AD Chin Wang.

Photoset

rafaeldraws:

World Cup Highlights

Series of illustrations done for Highsnobiety.com

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pgdigs:

1974: Many moons later, Harris’ autograph remains in tact
At age 7, Mike Thuransky had the pleasure of meeting and getting the signature of Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame running back Franco Harris. 
“I still have the autograph,” he said.
The picture was taken 40 years ago. Plenty has changed since Harris propped his brief case up on his knee and took a pen to paper for a young fan back in December 1974.
The 1970s Steelers, the NFL’s powerhouse team of that decade, were on their way back to the Steel City after claiming their second AFC Central Division title in three years. They downed the New England Patriots, 21-17, and Harris scored the game’s first touchdown en route to running for 136 yards.
“I knew the Steelers were going to be there [in the airport],” he said. “I was also there because my mother was getting off a flight, so our grandmother had us there.”
Thuransky is a life-long Steelers’ fan. His birthday, Jan. 21, arrived each year just as the dominant ’70s Steelers seemed to be contending for a Super Bowl. In fact, the franchise claimed its third Super Bowl on Jan. 21, 1979, Thuransky’s 12th birthday.
With an image of a helmeted Harris catching the Immaculate Reception in most fans’ minds, seeing him in street clothes seemed so bizarre to a young Thuransky.
“You know I always saw him as a football player,” he said. “I saw him with a brief case and I was awe struck, I was like, ‘What’s he doing in those clothes?”
Thuransky said Harris was more than willing to sign an autograph for him and his brother. Mike, however, was the one captured by Pittsburgh Press photographer Anthony Kaminski.
He still has that autograph, but he’s been trying for several years to get another from Harris.
“I have multiple pictures of the picture from the article,” he said. “I’ve been trying to get Franco to sign the picture of him signing the autograph for me.”
— Ryan Petrovich

pgdigs:

1974: Many moons later, Harris’ autograph remains in tact

At age 7, Mike Thuransky had the pleasure of meeting and getting the signature of Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame running back Franco Harris. 

“I still have the autograph,” he said.

The picture was taken 40 years ago. Plenty has changed since Harris propped his brief case up on his knee and took a pen to paper for a young fan back in December 1974.

The 1970s Steelers, the NFL’s powerhouse team of that decade, were on their way back to the Steel City after claiming their second AFC Central Division title in three years. They downed the New England Patriots, 21-17, and Harris scored the game’s first touchdown en route to running for 136 yards.

“I knew the Steelers were going to be there [in the airport],” he said. “I was also there because my mother was getting off a flight, so our grandmother had us there.”

Thuransky is a life-long Steelers’ fan. His birthday, Jan. 21, arrived each year just as the dominant ’70s Steelers seemed to be contending for a Super Bowl. In fact, the franchise claimed its third Super Bowl on Jan. 21, 1979, Thuransky’s 12th birthday.

With an image of a helmeted Harris catching the Immaculate Reception in most fans’ minds, seeing him in street clothes seemed so bizarre to a young Thuransky.

“You know I always saw him as a football player,” he said. “I saw him with a brief case and I was awe struck, I was like, ‘What’s he doing in those clothes?”

Thuransky said Harris was more than willing to sign an autograph for him and his brother. Mike, however, was the one captured by Pittsburgh Press photographer Anthony Kaminski.

He still has that autograph, but he’s been trying for several years to get another from Harris.

“I have multiple pictures of the picture from the article,” he said. “I’ve been trying to get Franco to sign the picture of him signing the autograph for me.

Ryan Petrovich

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scorpiondagger:

this GIF is from this video.

scorpiondagger:

this GIF is from this video.

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newyorker:

Photos of how Harold Edgerton, the MIT professor who invented the strobe flash in the 1930s, experimented with his own technology: http://nyr.kr/XbIv2M

newyorker:

Photos of how Harold Edgerton, the MIT professor who invented the strobe flash in the 1930s, experimented with his own technology: http://nyr.kr/XbIv2M

(Source: newyorker.com)

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usclibraries:

There was an auto racing speedway in Beverly Hills from 1920-24. (USC Libraries – California Historical Society Collection)

usclibraries:

There was an auto racing speedway in Beverly Hills from 1920-24. (USC Libraries – California Historical Society Collection)

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amjayes:

"There is a lack of will to develop rallying as a sport. We feel rallying is being kept under a lid. I know from when we go to the villages that the knowledge and interest is everywhere. People know that rallying is much more human than F1, they can get much closer to us as a sportsmen. It doesn´t serve a balanced interest to keep rallying under a lid. We, as drivers, are very worried about it." - Ari Vatanen ..in 1994.

amjayes:

"There is a lack of will to develop rallying as a sport. We feel rallying is being kept under a lid. I know from when we go to the villages that the knowledge and interest is everywhere. People know that rallying is much more human than F1, they can get much closer to us as a sportsmen. It doesn´t serve a balanced interest to keep rallying under a lid. We, as drivers, are very worried about it." - Ari Vatanen ..in 1994.

(via beardedninjas)

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ourpresidents:

Gerald R. Ford walks with Darrell Johnson, manager of the Boston Red Sox, and George “Sparky” Anderson, manager of the Cincinnati Reds, before the start of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 7/13/76.
-from the Ford Library 

ourpresidents:

Gerald R. Ford walks with Darrell Johnson, manager of the Boston Red Sox, and George “Sparky” Anderson, manager of the Cincinnati Reds, before the start of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 7/13/76.

-from the Ford Library 

(via todaysdocument)

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adventuremonkey1:

After work #gravelgrinder. Pushed it hard tonight. My legs are fried. Great night. #cycling #bicycle #kansas #flinthills

adventuremonkey1:

After work #gravelgrinder. Pushed it hard tonight. My legs are fried. Great night. #cycling #bicycle #kansas #flinthills

(via zombiefalcon)

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thefilteredflaneur:

Unique Sidewalk Sale #6 / Curveballs / Philadelphia / October 2013

thefilteredflaneur:

Unique Sidewalk Sale #6 / Curveballs / Philadelphia / October 2013